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Cover image for lecture: Epigenetic Effects of Breastmilk

Lecture Overview

Is it time to start viewing breastmilk as the 'postnatal placenta'? Rich in nutrients and other immunoprotective substances, breastmilk is effective in preventing communicable and non-communicable diseases later in life. This session looks at the epigenetic effects of human breastmilk and its important role, long after solids have been introduced.

Educators

Portrait of Heather Harris
Heather Harris Visit

Heather Harris first qualified as a midwife in 1970 and has worked in all areas of midwifery practice over the intervening years. She has served on a number of professional committees over the years, including ACMI (Vic) and ALCA (now LCANZ). She was involved in the successful BFHI accreditation for Mitcham Private Hospital, the RWH, and Box Hill hospital. She is a breastfeeding specialist who first qualified as an IBCLC in 1991. She has also been involved in the education of health professionals, presenting in all States of Australia, as well as in the US and Hong Kong. Since 2001, Heather has served as a midwife with Doctors Without Borders in the Ivory Coast, South Sudan, Somalia, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. She currently has her own private practice in lactation consultancy.

Reviews

4.7
7 Total Rating(s)
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Mary Wyn
02 Sep 2019

Brilliant

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Kathryn O'mara
29 Aug 2019

Thought provoking

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gillian homan
25 Jul 2019

Interesting- however presenter stumbled over her sentences & read a great deal from her notes which was distracting

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Susanne Savona
03 Jul 2019

Very interesting & informative. An excellent lecture.

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Deirdre Tarrant
01 Jul 2019

Thankyou very informative expecially Pre term infants & the importance of colostrum

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Julie schiller
24 Jun 2019

Excellent Presenration from Heather Harris, extensive information about the amazing qualities of breastmilk & the significance to the human race & our health