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Abnormal Posturing (Decerebrate and Decorticate)

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Abnormal posturing is used to describe an involuntary, abnormal body posture that occurs in response to a noxious stimulus. In most cases, abnormal posturing is caused by severe trauma to the central nervous system. There are two types of abnormal posturing: decerebrate and decorticate.

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Abnormal posturing is used to describe an involuntary, abnormal body posture that occurs in response to a noxious (pain-causing) stimulus. In most cases, abnormal posturing is caused by severe trauma to the central nervous system. Abnormal posturing is a medical emergency indicative of very serious injury, and the patient will likely be unconscious. Most patients displaying abnormal posturing will need to be ventilated and admitted to the intensive care unit.

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238 reviews by Ausmed Learners
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Portrait of Kate Kilpatrick
Kate Kilpatrick
21 Feb 2022
Great
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Clare Thompson
16 Mar 2022
Registered Nurse
Really excellent as a knowledge refresher
Portrait of Tracey Markham
Tracey Markham
25 Feb 2022
Easy read, great information
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Jodie Comfort
18 Mar 2022
.
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Thi HA
24 Feb 2022
Amazing
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Debra Curran
26 Feb 2022
Very clear and descriptive presentation
MS
Manveer Shergill
01 Apr 2022
clear , consize but very important information
MS
Maggie Sullivan
20 Apr 2022
Interesting
EB
Elfrida Beer
26 Mar 2022
Very informative
EB
Evan Baker
25 Mar 2022
Paramedic
I really enjoyed this article! Anyone who has ever managed (or will manage) a patient with significant brain injury will benefit from having this knowledge behind them. It's short but informative.
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